Music Review – Darts – Below Empty and Westward Bound

After a bit of a hiatus, I recently got back into writing reviews for Semplesize. I’ve done a couple in the last couple of weeks and am hoping to keep up the impetus, which is lucky because otherwise I’d have run out of ones to repost on this site pretty soon.

I quite enjoyed doing the review for this Darts track, although it bought back lots of memories that I thought had been filed under: slightly vacant teenage years.

As ever, the original is here.


 

About five years ago I auditioned with a band called CatBoy and the Dogs of Sin. As soon as I hit the play button on Commanche, the first track on Darts’ new album, the growly guitar tryout from my past danced through my head in vivid surround sound. The main thing the two bands share is a fondness/slightly worrying stalker tendency towards all things Mudhoney.

Okay, so they’re not a one trick pony and seem to have a few other influences too, Sonic Youth, Dinosaur Jr., The Pixies (are you seeing a theme yet?), but for the most part the Mark Arm-esque vocals on all the tracks led by one of the two Ayers brothers don’t veer far from the gravelly, shouty, jagged template created in 1988, when Superfuzz Bigmuff was released.

Talking of which, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if they used both Bigmuff and Superfuzz pedals while making this album, there’s certainly a lot of aural crunch going on all over the place.

The female led tracks, such as Aeroplane and Below Empty, while different in their way are stylistically close enough to the other songs to give the whole thing a bit of personality, even if that personality happens to feel more at home 30 years in the past.

Commanche and Dead both take their cues from The Pixies, even down to using an American Indian tribe’s name, a la The Navajo Know, for the first track and outright stealing the drum beat from La La Love You and using it for a fill in Dead, the name of which is, incidentally, lifted directly from another song on Doolittle!

The rest of the songs veer uncontrollably between Mudhoney and Sonic Youth with dirty guitars and screeching solos. The only departure is on the closing track, My Darling Bendigo, which takes the time machine even further into the past, feeling like a long-lost Velvet Underground song, with sustained feedback drilling into your ears underneath the avant-garde split gender vocals. But they can’t help themselves, at about 1:52 a guitar straight from the Sonic’s Sugar Kane cuts in and it’s back to the shouting.

Overall this is a good album with a lot to keep you interested, my advice would be that if you like it and you’ve never listened to Mudhoney, the Sonic’s, Dinosaur Jr. or any of their original alternative cohort from the 1990s you should look them up when the last track of Below Empty & Westward Bound finishes.

 


 

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About Dan Ladle

Part Man, Part Machine, All Diabetic. 1 Wife, 1 Son, 1 Daughter, 1 Cat, 1 Insulin Pump, Type 1 Diabetic, Writer, Musician, Web-Monkey, Idiot. View all posts by Dan Ladle

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